Getting the ball rolling for EFC in the 21st century

1970 White Plains EncampmentRuth E. Thaler-Carter attended the Encampment in 1970 in White Plains, New York, and was pivotal to the revitalization of the Encampment in the 21st century. We spoke with Ruth about her early EFC experiences and how she came to start the ball rolling for the new Encampment in 2009.

Ruth is an award-winning freelance writer/editor and the owner of Communication Central, which hosts an annual conference for freelancers. She also is in the process of launching ownership of a publishing business to work with independent, self-publishing authors. Ruth recently received a Big Pencil Award from Rochester, New York’s Writers and Books, for being “A teacher of adults who has inspired the creation and appreciation of literature” who has “contributed significantly in the advancement, creation, and understanding of literature in the Rochester community.”

What was your first impression of the Encampment?

It was an adventure, and I hoped to make friends and learn something about the world. My first impression was that I had found a community where I could be comfortable, useful and involved.

 What topic did you spend the most time on at the Encampment and what did you learn?

I participated in the United Nations Youth Assembly. It was fascinating! I knew French, German and Spanish, and was very interested in languages and international relations, so going to the UN and being part of that, even at the youth level, was very exciting.

At the Encampment, seeing the projects that other groups did was a great way to show us that one person could do something that made a difference. It showed us that it’s possible to get together with people from completely different backgrounds as friends and colleagues, and that young people could get things done in their communities. The Encampment showed (and shows) that ideals can work in the real world. EFC was hands-on, practical. You could take it home with you. Even if you didn’t use it right away, you could use it in later years. It was experience of a practical nature that you could use at various points in life – and it still is.

How has the Encampment influenced your life?

I didn’t go into a formal community organizing or public role, although I did work for the Urban League, a fair housing association and a national neighborhood nonprofit. Much of what I’ve done in regular jobs and almost everything I do as a freelancer, though, is with community nonprofits or organizations that are helpful to other people, and I see that as a result of the Encampment. I also made friendships that have continued to this day. There are lasting impacts beyond the friendships. Because of the Encampment, I had a greater and deeper exposure to people of other backgrounds and to activism, community leadership and the idea that one person can make a difference.

What is your favorite memory or story from the Encampment?

Oh, there are several, but the most important has to do with a first love. I’ll just leave it at that.

Tell us how the revitalization of the EFC evolved.

At a milestone number of years since my EFC experience, I wanted to reconnect. I contacted the Ethical Society and asked if there was any interest in a reunion, and they loved the idea. I had kept my Encampment yearbook, and I called or wrote to as many of my fellow Encampers as possible. Beth Daniels and Marina Chang from our Encampment helped me find a few more via the Internet. Margot Gibney had records of our Encampment, which also helped. Then it grew from just being White Plains 1970 to including as many people from other Encampment years and locations as possible, and then to creating the EFC alumni association.

All it took was one person saying, “Hey, let’s get together for a reunion. And, now that we’re in contact, what else can we do?” Other people said, “Let’s restart the organization!” Just as we learned in our Encampment, one or a few people can make things happen.

Ruth at 2015 Big Pencil event2

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s